Building friendship and a better life in Zambia

By Mia and Andrew Gaule

 

Building friendships and seeing how your support helps

My dad and I visited Moreen, who has been my pen pal and sponsored child for about 10 years which is when the project started in her village. She is now 15, the same age as me. We were welcomed with song and dance and smiles all round and were presented with gifts and thanks from the family. We had lunch with Moreen and her family and visited 2 local primary schools that are being supported by World Vision. The schools are developing but still in a poor state with the need for more desks, books and latrines. We also heard of the reasons why children cannot come to school, such as not knowing the importance of education, having to work, not having sanitary products and becoming pregnant.

 

Water, sanitation and livelihoods

The following day we visited a solar powered subversive irrigation pump which helped the local farmers produce a large yield of successful, healthy vegetables and fruit which they could sell in the markets and improve the local economy. We were shown around the fields and were again welcomed with song and dance!

Empowering Children and Communities

Later that day we visited the third school World Vision supports in the area to take part in a CVA (citizens voice and action) presentation and talk by the committee of the school. We were joined by the school's children’s Human Rights Movement which was run by a school girl called Grace. She told us how her group encourages and supports others to go to school and offers help if required.


A big thank you to all those who supported these charities and helped us fundraise for such good causes. Over £2000 has been raised through GCV Symposium quiz, Mamma Mia movie night at St Dunstans, Kop Hill afternoon teas and various donations, Thanks to you!

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